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Weapons Satellites Philip Wolny

Weapons Satellites

Philip Wolny

Published January 1st 2003
ISBN : 9780823938551
Hardcover
63 pages
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 About the Book 

Fascinating Information Details the History, Design, Use and Future Development of Six Types of Satellites Currently Orbiting Our Planet Since the launch of the Soviet satellite Sputnik in 1957, space has been considered the latest--and perhapsMoreFascinating Information Details the History, Design, Use and Future Development of Six Types of Satellites Currently Orbiting Our Planet Since the launch of the Soviet satellite Sputnik in 1957, space has been considered the latest--and perhaps final--frontier of exploration, research, espionage, and even warfare. Forty-five years after the Soviets placed the small, beeping metal ball into orbit, there are now thousands of satellites orbiting our planet with very specialized jobs. Some of them, like earth imaging satellites, photograph Earth in order to track environmental changes. Others, like communications satellites, connect the peoples of the world together in an ever faster and tighter web of radio, television, cell phone, and computer connections. Some gaze outward to explore the darkest mysteries of deep space, while others gaze down on Earth to reveal the most shadowy secrets of our enemies. The Library of Satellites examines in detail some of the most intriguing, sophisticated, and technologically advanced satellites orbiting Earth. From the days of the earliest human conflicts to modern warfare, gaining the high ground over an enemy has offered a huge tactical advantage. Whether from a hill, castle, or warplane, the ability to attack from above has often ensured success. Many people fear that space is the next high ground, as countries race to place weapons and defense satellites into orbit. Some may be designed only to knock out enemy missiles, while others may launch attacks upon targets on Earth or in space. Philip Wolny explores one of the most secretive corners of military planning to report on the current status and likely future of weapons satellites.