Home » Ruth Hall - A Domestic Tale of the Present Time - The Original Classic Edition by Fanny Fern
Ruth Hall - A Domestic Tale of the Present Time - The Original Classic Edition Fanny Fern

Ruth Hall - A Domestic Tale of the Present Time - The Original Classic Edition

Fanny Fern

Published
ISBN : 9781486437214
Paperback
114 pages
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Finally available, a high quality book of the original classic edition of Ruth Hall - A Domestic Tale of the Present Time. It was previously published by other bona fide publishers, and is now, after many years, back in print. This is a new andMoreFinally available, a high quality book of the original classic edition of Ruth Hall - A Domestic Tale of the Present Time. It was previously published by other bona fide publishers, and is now, after many years, back in print. This is a new and freshly published edition of this culturally important work by Fanny Fern, which is now, at last, again available to you.Get the PDF and EPUB NOW as well. Included in your purchase you have Ruth Hall - A Domestic Tale of the Present Time in EPUB AND PDF format to read on any tablet, eReader, desktop, laptop or smartphone simultaneous - Get it NOW.Enjoy this classic work today. These selected paragraphs distill the contents and give you a quick look inside Ruth Hall - A Domestic Tale of the Present Time:Look inside the book:Ruth, also, remembered when her father came home and found company to tea, how he frowned and complained of headache, although he always ate as heartily as any of the company- and how after tea he would stretch himself out upon the sofa and say, I think Ill take a nap- and then, he would close his eyes, and if the company commenced talking, he would start up and say to Ruth, who was sitting very still in the corner, Ruth, dont make such a noise- and when Ruths mother would whisper gently in his ear, Wouldnt it be better, dear, if you laid down up stairs? ...Equally astonishing to the unsophisticated Ruth, was the demureness with which they would bend over their books when the pale, meek-eyed widow, employed as duenna, went the rounds after tea, to see if each inmate was preparing the next days lessons, and the coolness with which they would jump up, on her departure, put on their bonnets and shawls, and slip out at the side-street door to meet expectant lovers- and when the pale widow went the rounds again at nine oclock, she would find them demurely seated, just where she left them, apparently busily conning their lessons! ...The doctor regarded it as a little automaton,40 for pleasant AEsculapian experiments in his idle hours- the old lady viewed it as another barrier between herself and Harry, and another tie to cement his already too strong attachment for Ruth- and Betty groaned, when she thought of the puny interloper, in connection with washing and ironing days- and had already made up her mind that the first time its nurse used her new saucepan to make gruel, she would strike for higher wages